DIY burnout

Seasons

I haven’t posted in awhile. I was considering why not, and it occurred to me that a Do-It-Yourself-er saves money by working on projects themselves. But when all the work is done by you, projects compete with your other priorities for your time and just don’t always come in first.

For all you DIY-ers who are going strong this spring, I just added a new page on backyard landscape design ideas. It includes ideas for planning your dream backyard.

This past year I haven’t put yard improvements at the top of my list, but I still have been able to enjoy my landscape. Many of the plants I added when first moving here are reaching mature sizes. I enjoy walking around the yard and seeing the flowers and new growth during spring. This is the part of landscaping that I find rewarding: a beautiful space that complements the surrounding desert and inspires me.

So, when a landscape is in stasis, what do I do to maintain everything? So far this year we’ve harvested citrus fruit, pruned trees and bushes, sprayed pre-emergent on all rocked areas, weeded around plants, planted a small garden, and added a few new plants. Spring is a good time to check that all irrigation emitters are working properly. The seals on the irrigation valve near the house get old and leaky, requiring replacement every few years. A xeriscape landscape is easier to maintain than many others because many of these chores are only done once a year.

This year my garden included lettuce, sunflowers, and zucchini. The lettuce is already bolting in the heat and the zucchini will die off in another month. The birds love the sunflowers.sunflowers_arizona

I added a couple of new native plants this year that I found at the Black Mountain Nursery in Cave Creek. I found Mormon tea, goldeneye, and desert milkweed there. I have better luck finding native plants at independent nurseries than at chain stores.

In the future, I still have plans to do some big projects in the yard. I would like to build a ramada-style porch extension, add crushed granite on all walkways, install flagstone pavers on the back porch and some artificial turf immediately off of that, and finish landscaping one area with some more shrubs.

Whether you’re starting projects or enjoying what you have, hope you enjoy your landscape this spring!

Summertime landscape chores

Seasons

How did you enjoy the flooding?

basin flood

Phoenix flooding

With all of the rain, my landscape is looking green this summer! I’m especially happy that the young cacti in my yard that were a little sunburned look much healthier. The first year in the ground is always hardest for a plant.

My bushes grow more than average with the extra water, which means they look due for pruning. Since I don’t like gumdrop shapes, what is the best way and timing for pruning?

summer desert bushes

Bushes have grown and greened up with the rain.

I found a pruning schedule with recommendations specific to each plant. For many bushes it recommends only pruning once or twice a year. Here is another pruning overview by U of A. I’m surprised to find that they don’t recommend pruning Texas Sage in summer, since it tends to be one of the most often-pruned plants.

Texas sage

Texas sage in bloom, getting large and shaggy

A late summer pruning helps trim back excessive growth, but will reduce blossoming ends and could be put off until spring. If you prune, try selective thinning, where you remove entire branch sections, either to a fork or to the ground, to open up the bush. It’s harder, scratchier work, but results in a more natural shape.

Some desert trees should be pruned later in the summer (as opposed to spring) to prevent excessive growth. Now is a good time to thin Mesquites, Ironwoods, and Palo Verdes.

So, with that information, there’s probably less pruning to do than you thought. Perhaps just some thinning of a few plants that have grown more than you wanted during our rainy season.

Pruning: gumdrops and lollipops?

Seasons

Yesterday a landscaper knocked on my door and asked if I wanted my bushes pruned. Sorry, but I’m too picky about how they look.

Most landscaping companies prune bushes into little balls and cylinders that don’t look natural at all. They prune palo verdes into single stemmed, tortuously twisted trees that look terrible.

In my opinion, a native landscape should look somewhat native. So what pruning do I do?

Arizona xeriscape wildflower garden

Unpruned wildflower garden

Trees

I prune my trees when young to usually have a single trunk at the base and then branch into multiple trunks within the first 3 feet. Then I prune the branches to raise the canopy to whatever height I need for the space and allow me to see the branching trunks. Once the tree approaches the size I want for the main branches, I may let it grow or just prune the branches that fill in or grow downward. I don’t worry about my desert trees getting top heavy and blowing over in wind storms because I water them deeply and infrequently to encourage root growth. The limited water also limits the canopy growth and keeps the wood dense and strong.

pruned palo verde

pruned palo verde

Bushes

Some bushes don’t need to be trimmed. If they have a nice shape and are in a spot where they can grow to their mature size without crowding, then I let them go. Creosote and jojoba don’t need pruning. I do have texas sage which I prune twice per year in summer and fall. When some of them get large the branches fall over leaving a gap on top. Native wildflowers like brittlebrush and marigold can get chopped off when they go dormant or leave them for a natural (if brown) look.

If you have a native landscape and your plants are mature, you can adjust the water so they grow slowly never need pruning. Prickly pear are a great example of this: with lots of water they will grow lots of pads, and you may have to cut some off to maintain the shape or size you need. With less water, they will grow fewer pads and stay smaller.

Texas sage needs pruning

Texas sage needs pruning

Cacti

Cactus don’t need pruning. I do cut pads off prickly pear. I will cut out extra canes of ocotillo if I don’t like where they branch. I never prune desert spoon, agaves, or yuccas. (Large pruned agaves look like pineapples.)

The plants that need the most pruning for maintenance are the non-natives: rose bushes, fruit trees, etc. Native landscaping requires much less pruning.

Wild native plants never get pruned

Wild native plants never get pruned

Fall landscape chores

Seasons

 

With the weather back in the beautiful range, I’ve spent a lot more time in the yard lately. I pruned my desert trees (mesquite, palo verde, ironwood)–since it is better to prune during the warm season than in spring. I sprayed the cochineal scale off my prickly pears and pruned a few pads. I have been setting out some of the small cacti that I bought and repotted in the spring to let them get more direct sun. Hopefully I can plant them this fall.

Baby desert trees

Top row from left: texas sage, mesquite, palo verde. Bottom cluster of three are creosote.

The late monsoon caused a lot of baby trees to sprout in my yard; both mesquite and palo verde. I tried potting some of them along with some seedling creosote. My survival rate is low. The baby trees that are the smallest dry out easily in pots and die. The larger specimens are hard to dig up because they already have long roots. Creosote bushes transplanted into pots easily die from over-watering. My best success with creosote was with two small seedling bushes that I transplanted to another spot in the yard. I was able to scoop their entire root system up with the shovel and after they were transplanted it was overcast for a few days.

During the summer I helped a friend make a landscape plan for her front yard. It included a circular drive, mesquite trees, lots of bushes, and cacti. Her husband has already started adding some hills to their landscape in preparation for planting. I’ll try to get some photos to share.