Free xeriscape plants — or how to landscape as cheaply as possible

Design ideas

Xeriscape doesn’t have to be expensive. A xeriscape landscape can be cheaper to build and maintain than a regular landscape. Do you want to change your landscape but have no money? Well, you may be surprised at how much you can do for free. Try these ideas.

Check craigslist

freelandscaperock

typical photo for free landscape rock

Craigslist has a free section where you can find landscape rock regularly. If one ad doesn’t provide enough for your project, you can collect a few types and try mixing them before spreading. Be aware that if you mix multiple types you will never be able to buy more that will match. That might not be a big deal as landscape rock tends to sink into the dirt over the years and you can add rock on top that is similar in color with no problem.

cactusforfree

Prickly pear, cholla, and agave — all easy to take starts from for a free cactus

You can also get free plants on craigslist. Prickly pear can be propagated easily. One free prickly pear plant on craigslist can provide enough starts for your yard. If you make prickly pear the major theme plant of your landscape, you may complete your entire landscape for free.

I don’t recommend trying to move a mature tree or saguaro cactus. Mature trees are too large to move without construction equipment. You will only be killing it and providing free tree removal. Moving saguaro requires permits, so even a “free” saguaro isn’t really free because you need to hire a saguaro moving company to get it to your yard.

Be creative

Do friends or neighbors have a mature landscape? Chances are they have volunteer plants they could give to you.

baby_palo_verde

this baby palo verde is about three years old and still only about three feet high

Many agaves make pups that can be dug and replanted. Texas sage bushes sometimes have small seedling bushes growing around their roots. Grasses can be divided into smaller clumps. Baby creosote bushes can be transplanted if you are careful to not disturb their roots.

I have also transplanted seedling palo verdes and mesquites. If you truly have no money and want trees, these will work. But in my opinion they are not worth the effort because they take so long to reach mature size.

Keep it simple

Xeriscape allows you to leave a large percentage of your yard empty while still achieving a landscaped look. If you can’t afford to buy a large variety of plants, do something interesting with a mass planting of one kind of plant that is easy to get for free.

Creosote and cholla can be grown without an irrigation system. Consider going ultra-low water and designing a landscape that doesn’t need an irrigation system. For a mass planting, grasses especially look modern. Try a row of grasses with a few clumps of prickly pear.

Mexican feather grass planted in a row for a modern look.

Summertime landscape chores

Seasons

How did you enjoy the flooding?

basin flood

Phoenix flooding

With all of the rain, my landscape is looking green this summer! I’m especially happy that the young cacti in my yard that were a little sunburned look much healthier. The first year in the ground is always hardest for a plant.

My bushes grow more than average with the extra water, which means they look due for pruning. Since I don’t like gumdrop shapes, what is the best way and timing for pruning?

summer desert bushes

Bushes have grown and greened up with the rain.

I found a pruning schedule with recommendations specific to each plant. For many bushes it recommends only pruning once or twice a year. Here is another pruning overview by U of A. I’m surprised to find that they don’t recommend pruning Texas Sage in summer, since it tends to be one of the most often-pruned plants.

Texas sage

Texas sage in bloom, getting large and shaggy

A late summer pruning helps trim back excessive growth, but will reduce blossoming ends and could be put off until spring. If you prune, try selective thinning, where you remove entire branch sections, either to a fork or to the ground, to open up the bush. It’s harder, scratchier work, but results in a more natural shape.

Some desert trees should be pruned later in the summer (as opposed to spring) to prevent excessive growth. Now is a good time to thin Mesquites, Ironwoods, and Palo Verdes.

So, with that information, there’s probably less pruning to do than you thought. Perhaps just some thinning of a few plants that have grown more than you wanted during our rainy season.